Creative Process – Doodling the Fears (Part 2)



I’m back! I got the missus and mutts up to her parents home. I now have an empty flat, mostly decorated, and soon to go up for sale. Trying to catch up with everyone in the blogosphere. Crikey, you guys, have been busy.

Next part of doodling the Little Fears. This time I want to give an outline of the individual illustrations I use for art prints, Threadless and logos.

I mentioned before I doodle six panels for stories and write six stories a day. For the stand alone illustrations, I doodle one to three a day, but I only aim to get one new character drawn per day.

I often draw a single character then scribble shapes around it. Recognize this lady?

I know almost nothing about what you are meant to do with digital art packages and proper art materials, so I stick to drawing with Posca paint pens and white paper. Regardless of what colours the characters end up, I try to stick to black, red and blue because they are easier for me to isolate on a computer.

I scan or photograph the doodles, get them onto my laptop when I isolate all the shapes and move them about until I am happy. I often soften the edges, but not so much they appear entirely smoothed. The texture is part of the appeal of my style, so I need to keep some lumps and bumps in there.

I use free software on my laptop, for those that are looking for a solid art package but cannot lay out the money for Photoshop try these.

Krita – Digital painting, creative freedom

Gimp – GNU Image Manipulation Program

Once on they look how I want them, I usually save them as PNG’s with transparent backgrounds. For the artists and designers, yes, I do know there are better file formats for me to use, but PNGs work for me.

I can then use these images for…

Book covers.

Art prints.

Logos.

Threadless T Shirts.

And YouTube and SkillShare videos.

Now there’s the magic. Not only can I draw from these images for future characters in the Little Fears, but six characters I have not posted here yet have an entire 90 tale story arc built around them. As I have been drawing one every day since January 2017, it also means I have a massive pool of characters to dip into when I want to introduce a new character to the Fears. Every character in the Little Fears was drawn on their own before being put into any of the tiles.

Some Skillshare course, not mine, for you to browse this week. Maybe something to inspire or teach you to create something awesome.

Learn GIMP by Brendon Schumacker.

GIMP is the free art package I use as a replacement for Photoshop. It’s a community run project has lots of free plugins and fancy brush packs on Deviant Art. This course is huge. About 6 hours long. It covers all the tools you need to know.

Cartooning Made Easy: Creating with Public Domain Comics by Angela Veals.

Angela is public domain and open source enthusiast. I took the course because it was a different way of creating comics. It turns out she’s GIMP user too.

  1. Thanks for sharing your process and software recs! That will be very helpful to me and many others, I’m sure.

  2. Pete, you are so cool! Definitely on my favorite list of talented/creatives’ list! I’ve enjoyed you from the beginning. Wait… that didn’t sound right. Did it?

  3. Sweet! Thank you for posting. Especially interested in the cartooning for beginners…been wanting to try my hand at this.

  4. All’s well that you moved, then! I could never get GIMP to behave or the interface theme to hold. It works like PS and Corel, but I waited until Corel begged me to buy it cheap and then found a gazillion free brushes. Tell the Missus your in charge of laundry until you and the Fears are gainfully employed!

    1. Can’t wait to buy a house up there. I adore London, love it to bits. But spent my entire life inside the M25. Time to move on!

      As for the washing, goes without saying. But I only have 2 sets of clothes with me. πŸ™‚

    1. Ah, now I can’t draw well haha! Most of what I doodle is shapes that I bludgeon into characters. πŸ™‚

      Nearly everyone can be creative though. Heck, I’ve been over to your blog a few times. You’re pretty darned creative and a good writer!

  5. As a newbie to technology of all kinds (first used a computer for e-mails in 2013 at an advanced age), this was fascinating to me to see what COULD be done! TY for educating me!

  6. This was so interesting. Thank you for sharing. Wish I had time right now to get into it, although drawing is not my forte. Alas, at the moment, that’s not possible. In the meantime, I enjoy your “bludgeoned” characters and thoughts.

    1. Thank you Twinkle. I enjoy reading methods for most creative activities. Even if it’s something I’ll never do, there’s often something I can glean from other peoples methods. πŸ™‚

  7. Well, you got to share your story of reaching the top along with this. I am very interested in how did you managed to gain this much readership and responsive public. By the way, your channel on YT will soon get a lot of subscribers if you keep up with your humor. This particular post was a very quality read with a lot of useful info. Thanks for actually helping the little guys.

    1. Howdy! I talk a lot about what I have going on. Sharing the journey as it were?

      Some of the posts are under this category (http://littlefears.co.uk/category/blog/) I shall be filling more posts into this link over the next week. πŸ™‚

      I also have two free courses on Skillshare. One on building a WordPress following and one on Social Media. Follow the link at the top of the website to Skillshare. πŸ™‚

  8. Fascinating process! So creative. So imatinative. I love what you’re doing, and am so glad you discovered my blog so that I could be so fortunate to discover you. Just delightful!

  9. I don’t get around here as much as I should but I when do, I like to binge read the mini stories. Your process doesn’t seem very complicated and it yields some amazing and very interesting results. Kudos to you πŸ™‚

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